The President’s Message

by Ari Bussel

The Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations met with the President of the United States recently.

His message was simple: “I know that not all of you agree with one another and that you do not speak in one voice.”

It does not take a smart person to point out the obvious, but it takes a very shrewd politician to take advantage of the situation.

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You’re a “Foolish” Man, Charlie Brown

By Norma Zager

As Charlie Brown runs toward the waiting football held aloft by Lucy, he lifts his leg anticipating a kick that will hurl the ball into space when suddenly, Lucy grabs the ball and regales with laughter as poor Charlie Brown once again falls flat on his face.

Watching terrorist events unfold in Israel leaves me with an unsettling feeling the United States is not far behind.

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A New Wrinkle in Time

By Norma Zager

“Lack of loyalty is one of the major causes of failure in every walk of life.” Napoleon Hill

Last night at our how-do-we-save-the-world meeting (yes, we actually do meet) a very smart man posed a question whose answer caused me great angst.

What do you think will happen, he asked me, when the United Nations recognizes Palestine as a sovereign state and sends in peacekeeping troops? The United States will be part of that deployment and suddenly U.S. soldiers will be fighting against Israelis.

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Not a War. Perhaps a Recreational Exercise?

By Norma Zager

“In the Middle Ages, the Wall received another name—the Wailing Wall—as Jews were observed here lamenting the Temple’s destruction. A legend says that on Ninth of Av, the anniversary of the Temple’s destruction, the dew glistening on the stones is the Wall itself shedding tears.” Jewish tradition

Readers, I now present the riddle for today. When is a war not a war? Answer: When it is the United States attacking Libya.

This goes hand in hand with that other great riddle: When is a terrorist attack not a terrorist attack?

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Pastor Billy’s Legacy of Faith

By Norma Zager and Ari Bussel

“Regarding the debate about faith and works: It’s like asking which blade in a pair of scissors is most important.” C.S. Lewis

Many times, we believe we know someone, until we are surprised to discover things we never knew about him.

This Postcard is about an extraordinary person who possessed numerous facets, most known to all. He was a renaissance man, a basketball player, a preacher and a photographer, and he led a massive congregation. He was a man of color, tall and striking in appearance with his hair formed into long, cascading cornrows.

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Learning from the Japanese Experience

by Ari Bussel and Norma Zager

It was the First Persian Gulf War and Saddam Hussein employed the use of long-range missiles against the Israeli home front.

The United States of America, then a staunch ally of Israel, had provided Israel with Patriot missiles that served as Israel’s only defense against the incoming Scud missiles.

Israel might have engaged, as was once Israel’s routine, in an attack against the Iraqi enemy on its home court. These would have been clandestine operations, befitting Israel’s glorious tradition of not waiting to be slaughtered and taking the initiative to carry out daring missions on enemy territory.

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Japan – What’s Next?

by Ari Bussel

Japan is trying to get back to normal, but is it really possible?

Allow me to start by quoting a reader’s comments to an earlier article I wrote about Japan – An Earthquake and a Tsunami:

Having been through multiple earthquakes — Sylmar, Whittier Narrows, Palmdale, NORTHRIDGE, let me try to explain what an earthquake does to you.

As we go through life, we base all our thoughts on certain foundation concepts. These are our “anchors” to explain the world.

When Terra Firma is not firma, essentially every single thing you think about life, the world, even the Universe is tossed out the door. YOU HAVE NO ANCHOR. NOTHING MAKES SENSE.

I assure you, ladies and gentlemen, you will never feel smaller, more powerless and more vulnerable than experiencing an earthquake of any size, but a 6.9 (for example) makes you feel 1 inch tall. You do what you can to appear to be in “control” but that is posturing. In your barbarian brain you have been knocked off the pillar.

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Why Should the World Condemn?

by Ari Bussel

“We will not rest until we lay our hands on the murderers. This incident is atrocious, its perpetrators capable of beastly crimes. Its scenes are horrific, the viewer unable to really grasp what happened.

“Israel expects the world to condemn the Palestinian incitement to terror and hatred in the strongest terms.” Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz, Israel’s Chief of Staff

Israel expects the world to focus its attention on five members of one family who were murdered on Shabbat evening in their home by a Palestinian Terrorist.

Israel is apparently in shock, but why would she be?

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Modern Day Anti-Semitism

By Norma Zager and Ari Bussel

The Palestinians, concluded the Israeli Government after fifteen months of extensive research, are inciting hatred and terror against the citizens and Government of Israel. To track this “culture of death,” Israel has now established an Index of Incitement.

The index was designed to motivate the Palestinian Authority to halt the incitement and promote a culture of peace. Its true importance is that it serves as a guide showing the harsh reality: Peace cannot be achieved when a “partner” for peace does not espouse peace but the other’s destruction. When the “partner” is engaged constantly in building structures of war rather than of peace and coexistence, the world’s expectations must be adjusted accordingly.

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Be Careful Not to Offend Israel

by Ari Bussel

There is nothing that can stop Israel or destroy her completely, if she only sets her mind on standing up and fighting back, if she only makes a decision to survive.

Something touched a raw nerve in the Israeli Government when Palestinian terrorists entered a home, murdered the parents, 35 and 36, and three of their children, 11, four and a three-month old. Three children survived—the eldest daughter who was out while the stabbing massacre was in progress and two of her younger brothers who were in a different room.

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